Winterizing hose spigots before winter

This past spring we changed a lot of hose bibbs that froze and broke over the past winter.  This upcoming spring we would like to see that less of our customers start the new season with hose bibbs that froze and broke over the winter.

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To prevent hose bibbs from breaking, if they are not the frost free type, they must be winterized properly.

GLBC, as a general rule, only installs the frost free type, but seeing as many non-frost free ones out there we know most people instead install the non-free type hose spigots.  We consider this a best practice.DSCF4804

But sometimes, if not treated properly the frost free hose bibbs will break as well.  To properly winterize, the hose outside must be removed and the valve must be colose completely.   That’s it, that simple.

For the plain (old style) hose spigots, there hoefully is a valve inside the house above the spigot that isolates the water supply line to the spigot.  That valve must be closed completely and then the valve outside must be opened to allow all the water in the line to drain out by gravity.

We often see newly flipped houses where the builders did not follow code and installed the old style sill faucets.  Why do the supply houses still sell the old style spigots if they are no longer allowed by Code?  The old style spigots are still sold because it is still permissable to use the old style for boiler drains and equipment drains inside the house.  Unfortunately many plumbers do not recognize the difference and since they are cheaper, they use the old style.

Also, the code requires the following for hose spigots:

“P2902.4.3 Hose connection. Sillcocks, hose bibbs, wall hydrants and other openings with a hose connection shall be protected by an atmospheric-type or pressure-type vacuum breaker or a permanently attached hose connection vacuum breaker.”

This is part of what we install but the vacuum breaker is not included in the old style spiots.

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