Concrete slab back at underground drain connection

In this video, we show to we pour back the slab in a basement where the original concrete was broken up to install a bathtub and relocate a laundry room.

We used a screed, a magnesium float, and a pool trowel to finish the concrete.

Gary Sr. Cuts Ceramic Tile on a Wet Saw (7/5/2013)

In the video below, our founder Gary Sr. shows us how to cut ceramic tile on a wet saw.

WARNING: you may want to lower the volume before watching this video.  The wet saw cuts at a very loud and high pitch.

To Gary Sr.’s right side of the ceramic tile, you can see the cut line.  The tile is run through the blade with the installed side intentionally positioned outside of the cut area.  By cutting the tile like this, you are sure not to lose any part of the tile that is to be installed. The other portion goes to scrap.  The blade width is taken out of the scrap piece of the cut tile. Here you can see Gary, Sr. and Gustavo use an ‘X’ to mark the piece they want to use.

I specifically do the opposite, I always mark the scrap piece with an ‘X’. They worked as partners, so they knew each other’s habits and quirks. Many types of installations go in most efficiently with specific crew or team sizes. Tile goes in best with two people working together. One person measures and sets the tile, and at the same rate the other one cuts the tile.

Historic Cast Iron and Steel Handrail Restoration in Capitol Hill

Historic Cast Iron and Steel Handrail Restoration in Capitol HIll

Restoration of historic handrails is an important part of our work here in Capitol Hill. Stair and handrail components like the ones we restored in this project are some of the beautiful architectural characteristics that make Capitol Hill unique.

The steel railings on this project had been replaced since the original construction; however, when they were replaced, the handrails were not properly welded or treated.

We reinstalled the handrails and welded them fully. In other photos (see below) you can see the closeup views of the weld joints. The weld joints previously were not treated properly. The slag had not been removed after the weld bead cooled. Painting directly to slag does not work because the paint will not stick to slag. So, over the years, following the previous repair, the joints had rusted through.

At the few locations where the joints had not rusted completely, the welds held but sheared off the cast iron post. We reattached everything and re-welded and treated the connections at all the posts.

Condition of newel post before the GLBC repair.

Condition of newel post before the GLBC repair.

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